Georgia policeman helps injured runner cross finish line in honor of his late dad

(Today) Robert McCoy completed a half-marathon over the weekend, but on Monday, his race medal went to the police officer who helped him cross the finish line.  McCoy had just turned the final corner of the route Saturday, part of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in Savannah, Georgia. He was about 200 yards from the finish line when he took a tumble, hitting his head on the asphalt and scraping up his face, knees and the back of his shoulder. “I just saw him hit the pavement and hit it pretty hard,” said Sgt. John Cain of the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department. He and other officers assigned to the area rushed to McCoy’s side.

“He was bleeding pretty good at the time, and he kept saying, in a whispering type of voice, ‘I’ve got to finish this race. Please help me, I’ve got to finish the race,'” Cain told TODAY.com. “At that point, I knew he had some mission he needed to accomplish. My heart bled for him. Literally, my heart went out to him.”

As it turned out, McCoy was running the race in honor of his father, who passed away from cancer this past April.

Read the rest of the story and see a video report HERE>

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Why the latest coloring-book craze can be good for you

(USA Today) When the going gets tough, real women start coloring. They’re picking up adult coloring books by the droves, at bookstores and craft stores, on Amazon.com and even from the Home Shopping Network. The designs appeal to every interest — from whimsical doodles to circular mandalas, nature scenes and fantasy worlds. Coloring not only evokes happy memories of childhood; the act can also foster a sense of well-being and offer a relaxing respite from our digital world. Crafters have known this intuitively for years.

An accumulation of research shows that these creative activities can help you de-stress from everyday pressures. Recent studies suggest that structured, rhythmic endeavors such as coloring, knitting, crocheting or quilting are particularly beneficial because they ease you into a meditative state of mind that allows you to push away negative thoughts and worries.

“These activities engage your hands as well as your mind and your focus,” says art therapist Lacy Mucklow, the author of several best-selling Zen-themed coloring books. “Plus, the repetitive actions release serotonin, the brain transmitter responsible for relaxation.”

Read the full story HERE>

Watch What Runners Do When Man’s Wheelchair Breaks Mid-Marathon in NY

(Good News Network) Brent Pease was pushing his brother Kyle along the New York City Marathon route on Saturday when a screech stopped them both in their tracks. Kyle’s wheelchair had broken. “We had come this far, we weren’t going to give up,” Brent told WNYW News. He tried carrying his brother, at first, but soon realized he wouldn’t be able to cover even a fraction of the distance to the finish line 13 miles away. The duo had another idea: tie some rope to the wheelchair—maybe Brent could hoist it up and act as a human wheel the rest of the way. When it became clear the weight was too much for Brent alone, other runners stepped in to save the day.

See the full story of what they did HERE>